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Stocks to watch: DBS, BreadTalk, Yoma, CNMC

STOCKS to pay special mind to on Monday morning exchanging incorporate DBS Bank, BreadTalk Group, Yoma Strategic and CNMC Goldmine.

DBS Bank: The moneylender’s income fell 25 for every penny for the second from last quarter from a year back to S$802 million, as the bank practically multiplied its particular arrangements for terrible obligations. Barring one-time things, for example, a S$21 million ANZ mix cost, net benefit remained at S$822 million, 23 for every penny bring down from the previous period.

BreadTalk Group: The gathering reported a 22.2 for every penny ascend in second from last quarter net benefit to S$4 million from a year back on the quality of its center sustenance and refreshment business. Income for the three months to Sept 30, 2017, plunged 2 for every penny to S$154.3 million.

Yoma Strategic: Real domain and buyer business venture firm Yoma Strategic Holdings Ltd said on Sunday that it has shut an arrangement exercise to raise about S$82.2 million. Under the arrangement work out, the organization will be issuing 155 million new common offers at S$0.53 per situation share, which speaks to a rebate of around 9.4 for every penny to the volume-weighted normal cost of S$0.5852 for every conventional offer for exchanges done on Nov 2 and Nov 3, preceding the offers were ended for exchanging.

CNMC Goldmine: Malaysian gold digger CNMC Goldmine Holdings has finished the development of its carbon-in-drain plant which will enable the firm to process higher-review gold mineral. In a Singapore Exchange documenting on Monday, the gathering said that trial creation at the plant – its third gold-mineral handling office – has begun, and business generation will start once operational procedures have been adjusted.

Read More- Singapore Stocks Market Growth outlook of Suntec REIT

Singapore Stocks To Watch

  • JIUTIAN CHEMICAL
  • COSCO SHIP SG
  • ALLIED TECH
  • CHINA STAR FOOD
  • ASIAPHOS

 

More Update:Share trading tips, SGX Stock PicksShare Market signals for Singapore stock Market

 

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Posted by on November 6, 2017 in Stocks, Uncategorized

 

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CDL Hospitality Trusts Update of the Day

CDL Hospitality Trusts‘ (CDLHT) results were in line with expectations. 3Q17 revenue increased 20.7% YoY to S$54.8m and NPI increased 15.9% to S$40.4m. The increase was mainly due to the inorganic contribution from The Lowry Hotel in Manchester (acquired 4 May 2017) and the Pullman Hotel Munich (acquired 14 Jul 2017) as well as a 56.1% YoY growth in NPI from New Zealand.

3Q17 DPU dropped 3.0% YoY to 2.29 S cents or 25.3% of our initial full-year forecast of 9.0 S cents.

Singapore Hotel RevPAR dropped 1.4% YoY in 3Q17 though we note that Singapore NPI as a whole increased 2.3%, mainly due to the 33.3% increase in Claymore Connect’s NPI contributions. Softer trading performance was observed for the Japan Hotels and Maldives Resorts, and NPI contributions from Hilton Cambridge City Centre came in lower due to the weakened pound.

Singapore Stocks To Watch

  • CSE GLOBAL
  • KOP
  • UMS
  • YONGNAM
  • SINGAPORE O&G

So Earn more With our Stock Recommendations

Recent Stock Recommendations

SGX:Buy UMS  || Level 0.980 || Cut Profit @ 1.015 || Return 3.57%

KLSE:Buy WONG || Level 1.30 || Cut Profit @ 1.38 || Return 6.15%

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Posted by on October 27, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

Equity Tips for Successful Share Investment

Paul Larson is a portfolio manager at OppenheimerFunds. Prior to this position, he was the chief equity strategist at Morningstar. During that period, he penned down some thoughts on what it would take to be a successful equity investor. We build on those. Think like an owner. Stocks represent ownership stakes in businesses and are not just pieces of paper to enable trading. Think like a business owner. If stocks are ownership slices of a business, we should value stocks like we value businesses. A business is worth the discounted value of all future cash flow that it can generate. Joe Mansueto,

Think like an owner. Stocks represent ownership stakes in businesses and are not just pieces of paper to enable trading. Think like a business owner. If stocks are ownership slices of a business, we should value stocks like we value businesses. A business is worth the discounted value of all future cash flow that it can generate. Joe Mansueto,

Stocks represent ownership stakes in businesses and are not just pieces of paper to enable trading. Think like a business owner. If stocks are ownership slices of a business, we should value stocks like we value businesses. A business is worth the discounted value of all future cash flow that it can generate. Joe Mansueto,

Think like a business owner.

If stocks are ownership slices of a business, we should value stocks like we value businesses. A business is worth the discounted value of all future cash flow that it can generate. Joe Mansueto,

If stocks are ownership slices of a business, we should value stocks like we value businesses. A business is worth the discounted value of all future cash flow that it can generate. Joe Mansueto, founder of Morningstar, explains it: An investor should think like a business owner, not a renter. Most business people don’t get up in the morning and ask whether they should sell their business that day. If they own a pizza shop, they don’t think about whether what they really should own is a shoe store instead. They show patience and persistence and try to understand their underlying business better so they can earn the greatest return for the longest period of time. Warren Buffett subscribes to the similar sentiment. “If you own your stocks as an investment—just like you’d own an apartment, house or a farm—look at them as a business. If you’re going to try to buy and sell them based on news or something your

They show patience and persistence and try to understand their underlying business better so they can earn the greatest return for the longest period of time. Warren Buffett subscribes to the similar sentiment. “If you own your stocks as an investment—just like you’d own an apartment, house or a farm—look at them as a business. If you’re going to try to buy and sell them based on news or something your neighbor tells you, you’re not going to do well. Find a good bunch of businesses and hold them,” he says. Stay within your circle of competence. An investor needs the ability to correctly evaluate selected businesses. You only have to be able to evaluate companies within your circle of competence. Do not be afraid to admit, “I don’t know” and/or that something is “too hard.” As Charlie Munger famously said: You’ll do better if you have

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Stay within your circle of competence. An investor needs the ability to correctly evaluate selected businesses. You only have to be able to evaluate companies within your circle of competence. Do not be afraid to admit, “I don’t know” and/or that something is “too hard.” As Charlie Munger famously said: You’ll do better if you have a passion for something in which you have the aptitude. If Warren had gone into ballet, no one would have heard of him. Having said that, remember that investing is a multidisciplinary exercise. Read widely. Look for wisdom in unconventional places, and always keep an eye out for opportunities. It was Benjamin Franklin who noted that “an investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” Keep an eye on value and price. According to Howard Marks, the “awareness of the relationship between price and value —whether for a single security or an entire market — is an essential component of dealing successfully with risk.” Focus on the value of the securities just as much as the price. If we know the price but do not know the value, we know nothing. One becomes a better athlete by practicing, not watching the scoreboard. Valuation matters. Paying too high a price for a stock can lead to disappointing returns, even if the underlying company subsequently performs wonder­fully. Look for situations where a company has to meet or exceed a low set of expectations priced in by the market. Don’t ignore Margin of Safety. There are two ways to make money in the stock market: Own businesses that will grow in value over time. Buy things below intrinsic value, and wait for the market to come around to recognize that value. Try to do both. The future is inherently uncertain, and one should always demand a margin of safety. The more uncertain a situation, the greater the margin of safety should be. To understand Margin of Safety, read How to buy stocks and cut your risk. According to Seth Klarman, a margin of safety is necessary because valuation is an imprecise art, the future is unpredictable, and investors are human and do make mistakes.

Look at Moats.

Businesses that have strong and sustainable competitive advantages—a wide an economic moat—will increase in value at a greater rate than those that do not. Wide-moat firms are also best suited for survival, possessing the high ground that will flood last, if at all, when a downturn hits. Focus on these firms. As Mohnish Pabrai explains: Moats are critically important. They are usually critical to the ability to generate future cash flows. Even if one invests with a time horizon of 2-3 years, the moat is quite important. The value of the business after 2-3 years is a function of the future cash it is expected to generate beyond that point. All I’m trying to do is buy a business for half (or less) than its intrinsic value 2-3 years out. In some cases intrinsic value grows dramatically over time. That’s ideal. But even if intrinsic value does not change much over time, if you buy at 50 cents and sell at 90 cents in 2-3 years, the return on invested capital is very acceptable. If you’re buying and holding forever, you need very durable moats. In that case you must have increasing intrinsic values over time. Regardless of your initial intrinsic value discount, eventually your return will mirror the annualized increase/decrease in intrinsic value. Look at reputation of the management. This works both ways. Look at the reputation of the management of the business you are investing in. And, also keep a tab on yourself. Warren Buffett advises investors to maintain a sterling reputation for honesty by “never doing something you wouldn’t want to see reported on the front page of your local newspaper.” Buffett, when chairman of Salomon Inc, famously told a Congressional panel that he had a simple message for employees in the wake of a scandal in 1991: “Lose money for the firm and I will be understanding. Lose a shred of reputation for the firm and I will be ruthless.” Patience is a virtue in investing. Activity for activity’s sake is harmful since frictional trading costs can greatly harm returns. Aim to minimize commissions, brokerage, taxes, and fees. As Paul Samuelson says, “investing should be like watching paint dry or watching grass grow. If you want excitement…go to Las Vegas.”

Read More – Stock Investment Tactics to Consider In Singapore Stock Market for Assured Output

Buy things below intrinsic value, and wait for the market to come around to recognize that value. Try to do both. The future is inherently uncertain, and one should always demand a margin of safety. The more uncertain a situation, the greater the margin of safety should be. To understand Margin of Safety, read How to buy stocks and cut your risk. According to Seth Klarman, a margin of safety is necessary because valuation is an imprecise art, the future is unpredictable, and investors are human and do make mistakes. Look at Moats. Businesses that have strong and sustainable competitive advantages—a wide an economic moat—will increase in value at a greater rate than those that do not. Wide-moat firms are also best suited for survival, possessing the high ground that will flood last, if at all, when a downturn hits. Focus on these firms. As Mohnish Pabrai explains: Moats are critically important. They are usually critical to the ability to generate future cash flows. Even if one invests with a time horizon of 2-3 years, the moat is quite important. The value of the business after 2-3 years is a function of the future cash it is expected to generate beyond that point. All I’m trying to do is buy a business for half (or less) than its intrinsic value 2-3 years out. In some cases intrinsic value grows dramatically over time. That’s ideal. But even if intrinsic value does not change much over time, if you buy at 50 cents and sell at 90 cents in 2-3 years, the return on invested capital is very acceptable. If you’re buying and holding forever, you need very durable moats. In that case you must have increasing intrinsic values over time. Regardless of your initial intrinsic value discount, eventually your return will mirror the annualized increase/decrease in intrinsic value. Look at reputation of the management. This works both ways. Look at the reputation of the management of the business you are investing in. And, also keep a tab on yourself. Warren Buffett advises investors to maintain a sterling reputation for honesty by “never doing something you wouldn’t want to see reported on the front page of your local newspaper.” Buffett, when chairman of Salomon Inc, famously told a Congressional panel that he had a simple message for employees in the wake of a scandal in 1991: “Lose money for the firm and I will be understanding. Lose a shred of reputation for the firm and I will be ruthless.” Patience is a virtue in investing. Activity for activity’s sake is harmful since frictional trading costs can greatly harm returns. Aim to minimize commissions, brokerage, taxes, and fees. As Paul Samuelson says, “investing should be like watching paint dry or watching grass grow. If you want excitement…go to Las Vegas.”

Don’t go overboard with diversification.

There is a dosage effect regarding portfolio diver­sity. Diversity is important to have, but too much can also dilute best ideas and excess returns. It can actu­ally be safer to have fewer baskets if it affords a much-closer watching of the eggs. Buffett believes that wide diversification is only required when investors do not understand what they are doing. “Know what you own, and know why you own it.” is how Peter Lynch puts it. The greater the payoff odds (lower price/fair value ratio), the greater the weight a position should be in a portfolio, all else equal. Likewise, the greater the confidence in one’s projections, the greater the position size should be, all else equal.

Always consider opportunity costs.

We should not be afraid to sell a good opportunity to take advantage of a great opportunity. We can generate value by selling dollar bills trading for $0.90 to buy other dollar bills trading for $0.60.

Keep an eye on value and price. According to Howard Marks, the “awareness of the relationship between price and value —whether for a single security or an entire market — is an essential component of dealing successfully with risk.” Focus on the value of the securities just as much as the price. If we know the price but do not know the value, we know nothing. One becomes a better athlete by practicing, not watching the scoreboard.

Valuation matters.

Paying too high a price for a stock can lead to disappointing returns, even if the underlying company subsequently performs wonder­fully. Look for situations where a company has to meet or exceed a low set of expectations priced in by the market. Don’t ignore Margin of Safety. There are two ways to make money in the stock market: Own businesses that will grow in value over time. Buy things below intrinsic value, and wait for the market to come around to recognize that value. Try to do both. The future is inherently uncertain, and one should always demand a margin of safety. The more uncertain a situation, the greater the margin of safety should be. To understand Margin of Safety, read How to buy stocks and cut your risk.

Read More – How to Manage your Stock Investment?

According to Howard Marks, the “awareness of the relationship between price and value —whether for a single security or an entire market — is an essential component of dealing successfully with risk.” Focus on the value of the securities just as much as the price. If we know the price but do not know the value, we know nothing. One becomes a better athlete by practicing, not watching the scoreboard. Valuation matters. Paying too high a price for a stock can lead to disappointing returns, even if the underlying company subsequently performs wonder­fully. Look for situations where a company has to meet or exceed a low set of expectations priced in by the market.

Don’t ignore Margin of Safety.

There are two ways to make money in the stock market: Own businesses that will grow in value over time. Buy things below intrinsic value, and wait for the market to come around to recognize that value. Try to do both. The future is inherently uncertain, and one should always demand a margin of safety. The more uncertain a situation, the greater the margin of safety should be. To understand Margin of Safety, read How to buy stocks and cut your risk. According to Seth Klarman, a margin of safety is necessary because valuation is an imprecise art, the future is unpredictable, and investors are human and do make mistakes. Look at Moats. Businesses that have strong and sustainable competitive advantages—a wide an economic moat—will increase in value at a greater rate than those that do not. Wide-moat firms are also best suited for survival, possessing the high ground that will flood last, if at all, when a downturn hits. Focus on these firms. As Mohnish Pabrai explains: Moats are critically important. They are usually critical to the ability to generate future cash flows. Even if one invests with a time horizon of 2-3 years, the moat is quite important. The value of the business after 2-3 years is a function of the future cash it is expected to generate beyond that point. All I’m trying to do is buy a business for half (or less) than its intrinsic value 2-3 years out. In some

There are two ways to make money in the stock market:

Own businesses that will grow in value over time. Buy things below intrinsic value, and wait for the market to come around to recognize that value. Try to do both. The future is inherently uncertain, and one should always demand a margin of safety. The more uncertain a situation, the greater the margin of safety should be. To understand Margin of Safety, read How to buy stocks and cut your risk. According to Seth Klarman, a margin of safety is necessary because valuation is an imprecise art, the future is unpredictable, and investors are human and do make mistakes. Look at Moats. Businesses that have strong and sustainable competitive advantages—a wide an economic moat—will increase in value at a greater rate than those that do not. Wide-moat firms are also best suited for survival, possessing the high ground that will flood last, if at all, when a downturn hits. Focus on these firms. As Mohnish Pabrai explains: Moats are critically important. They are usually critical to the ability to generate future cash flows. Even if one invests with a time horizon of 2-3 years, the moat is quite important. The value of the business after 2-3 years is a function of the future cash it is expected to generate beyond that point. All I’m trying to do is buy a business for half (or less) than its intrinsic value 2-3 years out. In some

Look at Moats.

Businesses that have strong and sustainable competitive advantages—a wide an economic moat—will increase in value at a greater rate than those that do not. Wide-moat firms are also best suited for survival, possessing the high ground that will flood last, if at all, when a downturn hits. Focus on these firms. As Mohnish Pabrai explains: Moats are critically important. They are usually critical to the ability to generate future cash flows. Even if one invests with a time horizon of 2-3 years, the moat is quite important. The value of the business after 2-3 years is a function of the future cash it is expected to generate beyond that point. All I’m trying to do is buy a business for half (or less) than its intrinsic value 2-3 years out. In some

Businesses that have strong and sustainable competitive advantages—a wide an economic moat—will increase in value at a greater rate than those that do not. Wide-moat firms are also best suited for survival, possessing the high ground that will flood last, if at all, when a downturn hits. Focus on these firms. As Mohnish Pabrai explains: Moats are critically important. They are usually critical to the ability to generate future cash flows. Even if one invests with a time horizon of 2-3 years, the moat is quite important. The value of the business after 2-3 years is a function of the future cash it is expected to generate beyond that point. All I’m trying to do is buy a business for half (or less) than its intrinsic value 2-3 years out. In some

Businesses that have strong and sustainable competitive advantages—a wide an economic moat—will increase in value at a greater rate than those that do not. Wide-moat firms are also best suited for survival, possessing the high ground that will flood last, if at all, when a downturn hits. Focus on these firms. As Mohnish Pabrai explains: Moats are critically important. They are usually critical to the ability to generate future cash flows. Even if one invests with a time horizon of 2-3 years, the moat is quite important. The value of the business after 2-3 years is a function of the future cash it is expected to generate beyond that point. All I’m trying to do is buy a business for half (or less) than its intrinsic value 2-3 years out. In some

Businesses that have strong and sustainable competitive advantages—a wide an economic moat—will increase in value at a greater rate than those that do not. Wide-moat firms are also best suited for survival, possessing the high ground that will flood last, if at all, when a downturn hits. Focus on these firms. As Mohnish Pabrai explains: Moats are critically important. They are usually critical to the ability to generate future cash flows. Even if one invests with a time horizon of 2-3 years, the moat is quite important. The value of the business after 2-3 years is a function of the future cash it is expected to generate beyond that point. All I’m trying to do is buy a business for half (or less) than its intrinsic value 2-3 years out. In some cases intrinsic value grows dramatically over time. That’s ideal. But even if intrinsic value does not change much over time, if you buy at 50 cents and sell at 90 cents in 2-3 years, the return on invested capital is very acceptable. If you’re buying and holding forever, you need very durable moats. In that case you must have increasing intrinsic values over time. Regardless of your initial intrinsic value discount, eventually your return will mirror the annualized increase/decrease in intrinsic value. Look at

Look at the reputation of the management.

This works both ways. Look at the reputation of the management of the business you are investing in. And, also keep a tab on yourself. Warren Buffett advises investors to maintain a sterling reputation for honesty by “never doing something you wouldn’t want to see reported on the front page of your local newspaper.” Buffett, when chairman of Salomon Inc, famously told a Congressional panel that he had a simple message for employees in the wake of a scandal in 1991: “Lose money for the firm and I will be understanding. Lose a shred of reputation for the firm and I will be ruthless.”

Patience is a virtue in investing.

Activity for activity’s sake is harmful since frictional trading costs can greatly harm returns. Aim to minimize commissions, brokerage, taxes, and fees. As Paul Samuelson says, “investing should be like watching paint dry or watching grass grow. If you want excitement…go to Las Vegas.” Don’t go overboard with diversification. There is a dosage effect regarding portfolio diver­sity. Diversity is important to have, but too much can also dilute best ideas and excess returns. It can actu­ally be safer to have fewer baskets if it affords a much-closer watching of the eggs. Buffett believes that wide diversification is only required when investors do not understand what they are doing. “Know what you own, and know why you own it.” is how Peter Lynch puts it. The greater the payoff odds (lower price/fair value ratio), the greater the weight a position should be in a portfolio, all else equal. Likewise, the greater the confidence in one’s projections, the greater the position size should be, all else equal. Always consider opportunity costs. We should not be afraid to sell a good opportunity to take advantage of a great opportunity. We can generate value by selling dollar bills trading for $0.90 to buy other dollar bills trading for $0.60.

Don’t be afraid to go against the crowd. As Benjamin Graham wrote, in the short term, the market is a voting machine. Popularity rules the day. In the long term,

As Benjamin Graham wrote, in the short term, the market is a voting machine. Popularity rules the day. In the long term, the market is a weighing machine, gravitating toward a company’s true intrinsic value. Buy on the cannons (when stocks are unpopular), sell on the trumpets (when euphoria reigns). John Templeton wisely says, “If you want to have a better performance than the crowd, you must do things differently from the crowd.” Which means, invest at the point of maximum pessimism.

As Benjamin Graham wrote, in the short term, the market is a voting machine. Popularity rules the day. In the long term,

In the short term, the market is a voting machine. Popularity rules the day. In the long term, the market is a weighing machine, gravitating toward a company’s true intrinsic value. Buy on the cannons (when stocks are unpopular), sell on the trumpets (when euphoria reigns). John Templeton wisely says, “If you want to have a better performance than the crowd, you must do things differently from the crowd.” Which means, invest at the point of maximum pessimism.

 
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Posted by on October 16, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

[SINGAPORE STOCK] Singapore Press Holdings Update

SPH reported that FY17 PATMI increased 32.0% YoY to S$350.1m mostly due to a gain of S$149.7m from a partial divestment of the group’s stake in the regional online classifieds business, and a fair value gain on investment properties of S$57.4m, which were partially offset by impairment charges of S$96m on the group’s magazine business and printing presses.

Singapore-momentum-stocks-SingPost

Excluding these one-time charges, however, FY17 recurring earnings declined 20.2% YoY and FY17 operating revenues also declined 8.2% lower as the core media business continued to suffer the disruption from digital media.

The property segment, however, delivered steady results as revenues increased 1.2% YoY from higher rental income from the group’s retail assets.

We deem this set of results to be mostly within our expectations. We put our rating and fair value estimate of S$3.25 under review.

More Update:Share trading tips, SGX Stock Picks, Share Market signals for Singapore stock Market

Venture Corp Share Investment Singapore www.mmfsolutions.sg

 
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Posted by on October 12, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

SGX Stock to Consider of this Week

It is common belief that when key appointment holders or majority shareholders start to accumulate shares of their own companies, it is usually a strong indication that the company is doing well and its share price is likely to follow suit. Naturally, who else could be more familiar with the performance of the companies other than the people who are actually running the show themselves?

There may be plenty of reasons for one to sell his shares but when he does buy shares, it could only be for one particular reason. And that is – to make money. That said, let us look at three stocks which recently experienced significant insiders buying.

Yangzijiang Shipbuilding 

Yangzijiang Shipbuilding (Holdings) (YZJ) announced on 31 August 2017 a share placement of 137 million new shares at $1.53 per share to raise net proceeds of around $209 million. Upon the announcement, share price plunged by more than 13.8 percent from the close on 30 August 2017 at $1.625 to $1.40 as of 27 September 2017.

The group intends to use up to half of the net proceeds to fund new investments and business expansion through acquisitions, and the remaining for working capital and general corporate purposes including the repayment of bank loans and debts.

As YZJ’s finance strength was robust with a net cash of Rmb1.1 billion before the placement, doubts were raised with regard to the need to raise funds, and there were speculations that the group was preparing for major mergers and acquisitions activities. Other possible explanations include enhancing liquidity due to tightened capital controls arising from certain high-profile incidents in China.

Yangzi International Holdings lent out 137 million shares to facilitate in the share placement, which is beneficially owned by the YZJ Settlement in which Ren Yuanlin, chairman of YZJ, is deemed interested in. Pursuant to the full settlement of the loan of the shares, Ren’s deemed interest in YZJ has enlarged from 22.7 percent to 25.4 percent as of 25 September 2017.

 Health Management International


Health Management International (HMI) owns and operates two tertiary hospitals in Malaysia – namely Regency Specialist Hospital (Regency) in Johor as well as Mahkota Medical Centre (Mahkota) in Malacca.

Mahkota, one of the most comprehensive cancer centre South of Kuala Lumpur, has plans to increase its capacity by adding 34 beds to its existing 266 beds making it to 300 beds in FY18. In addition, the medical centre stands to benefit from more flight routes for the Malacca airport in October 2017, which currently only offers flights to Pekanbaru and Penang.

Meanwhile, following a successful turn-around in 2014, HMI has confirmed its plans to double Regency’s bed capacity from the current 218-beds to an eventual 500-beds hospital. Construction of the new extension block is expected to commence in FY18 and slated for completion by FY21 at an estimated cost of RM160 million.

Both hospitals continue to register healthy patient growth as patients volume grew 3.7 percent year-on-year in 4Q17 and the growth of foreign patients has outpaced local patients. With the acquisition of 100 percent stake in the two hospitals completed in March 2017, higher earnings contribution due to the full ownership structure can be expected.

Dr Gan See Khem, Executive Chairman of HMI, has accumulated about 829,000 HMI shares through Nam See Investment over the last two week between the range from $0.635 to $0.655. As at 22 September 2017, Dr Gan’s deemed interest in HMI has grown eight basis points to 39.8 percent.

According to a research report by Maybank Kim Eng on 25 August 2017, the brokerage house maintained a BUY rating on HMI with a price target of $0.80.

Mapletree Logistics Trust


Mapletree Logistics Trust (MLT)
recently entered into an agreement to acquire Mapletree Logistics Hub Tsing Yi in Hong Kong from its sponsor, Mapletree Investments, at a consideration of HK$4.8 billion.

The acquired building is an 11-storey ramp-up warehouse with a net lettable area of 148.1k square meter. The property has remaining leasehold of 46 years, located in a strategic location to the city centre, and will be 100 percent occupied by October 2017. The agreed acquisition price is attractive as it translated into a net property income (NPI) yield of 5.7 per annum and is about 2.4 percent below valuation.

The acquisition is estimated to lift MLT’s asset under management and NPI by 15 percent and 14 percent respectively. In addition, it is also expected to be distribution per unit accretive, although aggregate leverage will edge up marginally to 38 percent.

As a result of a purchase of 600,000 units by DBS Group Holdings via a market transaction, major shareholder Temasek Holdings (Temasek) deemed interests in MLT have inched up to 40 percent as at 14 September 2017. Temasek’s deemed interests in MLT arise from the aggregation of interests held by DBS Group Holdings and Mapletree Investments.

A research report by Maybank Kim Eng released on 29 August 2017 revealed that the broker maintained a HOLD rating on MLT, giving it a target price of $1.20.

Source –  Sharesinv.com

 
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Posted by on October 3, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

Market News: Great Eastern says mulling options linked to minority stake in Malaysian operations

Great Eastern Holdings (GEH), the protection arm of OCBC Bank, affirmed it is surveying conceivable choices identifying with a minority stake in Great Eastern Life Assurance (Malaysia).

Notwithstanding, GEH says the appraisal is preparatory at the present minute and there is no conviction that an assertion will be gone into.

As indicated by Dow Jones Newswires provide details regarding Tuesday, GEH is said to have drawn in no less than one Malaysian bank to investigate offering its stake in its Malaysian operations for as much as US$1 billion ($1.4 billion).

Market News

The move by GEH and other remote backup plans is viewed as a push to meet Bank Negara Malaysia’s June 2018 due date to follow its command that insurance agencies inside the country be at any rate mostly claimed by neighborhood players.

Read More – Singapore Share Market News: Closure for China Hongxing shareholders? Ex-CEO makes $20.5 mil offer to buy subsidiaries

Offers in GEH shut at $25.70 on Wednesday.

Catch More –  Singapore stock Trading, Stock trading signalsIntraday trading signalsStock investment Singapore

 
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Posted by on September 21, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

SGX Share Golden Agri Resources movements of the day

  • CPO prices holding up
  • Expects production growth closer to 20%
  • Few near term catalysts

House View on CPO Outlook Recently Upgraded

Image result for Golden Agri Resources

The Malaysian Palm Oil Board released data yesterday that showed an 8.8% MoM rise in Malaysia’s palm oil stocks, a 0.9% decline in palm oil production while exports were up 6.4%. Recall that our view on CPO price outlook had been bearish, given the higher CPO production expected in 2017, sustained low oil prices, and healthy global alternative oilseed production weighing on overall oilseed prices.

Recently, OCBC Treasury Research revised their CPO outlook from MYR2,250 to MYR2,600/MT by year-end, mainly due to the fall in crude oil production levels especially seen in Malaysia for the month of Jun, and overall demand for palm oil was deemed healthy in the first seven months of 2017.

This estimate also lies within Golden Agri’s anticipations of around US$600-700/MT, underpinned by expectations of demand and restocking by key markets including China and India. Note that these supply and demand factors have supported CPO prices, with prices up ~4% for the past month.

Long Term Initiatives are in Place

As of 2Q17, the group has seen good production growth and expects FY17 production to be closer to a ~20% growth along with largely steady prices. While their estates’ average age of ~16 years (including plasma) is often considered as one of the oldest among plantation peers, we acknowledge the group’s initiatives to sustain growth in the longer term. This includes having two clones of high-yielding oil palm planting material that could potentially increase yields to above Indonesia’s industry average yields.

Replanting activities with the higher-yielding seeds may accelerate next year and could help them attain a favorable age profile. In addition, the group is also looking to improve long-term margins for the downstream segment, via strengthening the integration and efficiency along the supply chain.

Product portfolio continues to extend alongside increasing sales of palm-based refined products, while capacity is expanding in areas such as for kernel crushing in South Kalimantan.

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Posted by on September 12, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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